A Note about Sugarbush Draft Horses

I see it over and over again, and no matter how many times it's said, it's still wrong. "Sugarbush Drafts are just an Appaloosa Draft Cross". Uh.... no. The Sugarbush Draft Horse was a breed created many years ago in Ohio. While the initial cross was made using Percherons to Appaloosas, in the many generations following, the breed has been solidified into a consistent type. Saying these horses are "just" a draft cross makes as much sense as saying that AQHA horses are "just" a Thoroughbred cross, American Cream Drafts are "just" a dilute Belgian, or that Morgans are "just" a grade.

Monday, August 2, 2010

And this is how things should end up for every horse!

Today, I opened my email to see this.  This is Red Rover in his new home, where he's now called "Red".  Does he, and his new person look happy?

This made my day.  I love getting updates about my horses in their new homes.

Laura (his owner) said that her granddaughter is just pleased with him, and wishes that they could clone him.  Rover has a buddy that he gets along with perfectly, he has tons of attention, and he's starting to put on the rest of his weight.  Laura is taking care of his feet, and is committed to him for life.

Wow, this boy got the PERFECT home.  This is what makes it worthwhile.  Selling horses always sucks a little, because I miss them once they are gone.  And yet, I remember so clearly how excited I was to get my first horse, and from the look on that girl's face, she feels the same.  Good horses like Rover are worth their weight in gold.

Seeing these pictures almost made me tear up with joy.  I would bet money that the big guy is getting extra cookies and more pets and scritches then he knows what to do with. 

When Rover was diagnosed with Ringbone, I fully expected him to be here for a LONG time.  I know that many buyers are scared off by medical issues, and no matter how good the horse, ringbone makes them a hard sell.  I refused to hide his condition, because that's just not fair to any one, and anyone who knows me will tell you that my first priority is to the horse. 

I hope to get tons more updates on Rover in the future (You hear that Laura?) and if he ever needs a home, he's ALWAYS welcome back here.  So for all you Rover fans out there, here's proof that he's doing GREAT!

7 comments:

  1. What a happy ending/beginning! Good for Red! What more could we hope for for one our "babies"?

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's great news! How lucky for Rover and for his new little princess!

    Sure wish that little cutie gal on his back was wearing a helmet and some boots with a heel though.
    Horses can spook and be unpredictable and it only takes a second for someone to get seriously hurt. That little sweetie has a lifetime ahead of her and it would really stink if it was spent in a wheelchair.

    (Ok off of my worried mama soapbox)

    ~Lisa

    ReplyDelete
  3. I think that it's every parent and grandparent's right to determine what is best for their own children. As someone with no children of my own, and with out complete knowledge of that child or the entire story of each image, I most certainly am not qualified to make that decision for anyone else.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Well, I tend to give adults the benefit of the doubt, but I confess that I, too, had the same thought about the helmets. That's a long way down for those little ones. I can live with the tennies, since except for the one girl, their feet don't reach anyway.

    And it DID make me tear up! I'm so happy for him. He's such a good boy and deserves every bit of this.

    ReplyDelete
  5. As a Mother of three children, who just recently watched one of them go flying through the air and land with a horrifying thud on the ground, caused by a horse that was considered as 'bombproof' and trustworthy as Rover, I don't need to know another child's background or the story behind each picture to know that a horse can be dangerous and a child's brain should be protected from possible injury, or death.

    It's disturbing when we worry more about the safety and future of a horse more than we worry about the safety and future of a child.

    ~Lisa

    ReplyDelete
  6. Well, I tend to give adults the benefit of the doubt, but I confess that I, too, had the same thought about the helmets. That's a long way down for those little ones. I can live with the tennies, since except for the one girl, their feet don't reach anyway.

    And it DID make me tear up! I'm so happy for him. He's such a good boy and deserves every bit of this.

    ReplyDelete
  7. As a Mother of three children, who just recently watched one of them go flying through the air and land with a horrifying thud on the ground, caused by a horse that was considered as 'bombproof' and trustworthy as Rover, I don't need to know another child's background or the story behind each picture to know that a horse can be dangerous and a child's brain should be protected from possible injury, or death.

    It's disturbing when we worry more about the safety and future of a horse more than we worry about the safety and future of a child.

    ~Lisa

    ReplyDelete