A Note about Sugarbush Draft Horses

I see it over and over again, and no matter how many times it's said, it's still wrong. "Sugarbush Drafts are just an Appaloosa Draft Cross". Uh.... no. The Sugarbush Draft Horse was a breed created many years ago in Ohio. While the initial cross was made using Percherons to Appaloosas, in the many generations following, the breed has been solidified into a consistent type. Saying these horses are "just" a draft cross makes as much sense as saying that AQHA horses are "just" a Thoroughbred cross, American Cream Drafts are "just" a dilute Belgian, or that Morgans are "just" a grade.

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

The Story of How I got Kicked In the Head

This is the glory of my first time of truly being kicked by a horse.  3 hours in ER, 1 hour and 20 minutes of doctors stitching my my face, 40 sutures, 1 tooth missing, and one that I hope will stay with me a bit longer.  No my face is not that fat.  Yes, that is ALL swelling including down my neck.

And yes, I look like hell.

But let me back up a bit and tell you the whole story...........

Yesterday I finished up the Sugarbush Draft Horse Registry website (check it out, as it's REALLY pretty now) and I posted a few links to facebook.  After hassling with some silly buttons that just were beyond my technical capabilities, getting it all to work, and finally feeling like I deserved a break, I headed out to the only place a horse girl can relax - the barn!

Well, Sweetie came home recently, and she's shedding like a pig, so I decided that the first thing I would do is brush her out a bit.  I grabbed a shedding blade, and wandered out into the paddock closest to the barn.  Sweetie was standing right there, and so was Diva.
This was Diva a year ago (only thing I have right now with a size comparison).  She has grown at least a hand.
And here's Sweetie from last year (yeah, it's time to redo pictures, but I was waiting on the shed outs) Yep, Sweetie is even bigger now.  It's not like I picked little girls to play with!

From the start, Diva was being pushy.  SHE wanted to be brushed, and I told her to wait.  I moved her back, but I could see where this was headed.  I figured it would be a good lesson for Diva to learn some manners.  I THOUGHT she had a better understanding of "human rights" (you know, 2 legged things are always right, and you don't mess with them) then she evidently did.   Well, I had about 30 feet or more between the closest part of the horse.  I know there were at bare minimum three 10 foot fence sections between us.  I was well out of kicking range.  (For those who know the place, Sweetie and I were in the middle of the long pen kinda near the alley fence, and Diva was on the far side of the feeder).  By eye balling it, there was a minimum of 2 canter paces before she could get within striking distance.

So, I got two swipes on Sweetie, then saw her ear flick as I heard the movement.  With out thinking, I darted out of the way, towards Sweetie's hip (away from Diva).  Bad idea.  Sweetie swung that hip toward Diva and moved her head out of the way.  Natural instinct, but in effect it blocked me between them. I went to yell and thew my hands up, but never made  a noise.  The first hood caught my hand, with the second set right behind it catching me in the face and shoulder.  The shoulder was a glancing blow, and I ducked as much of the face as I could.  I thought "get in close to her and she can't kick as hard" but I couldn't.  I kept being moved into Sweetie.  For a brief second I thought I saw an opening, and then some how I was tangled in Sweetie's legs, and down on the ground.

At this point it was all noise, panic and dust to me.  My mother was up in the barn, maybe 100 feet away, and had seen the whole thing.  She was headed down the hill yelling and flailing at the girls.  According to her, she swore I took about 5 kicks in the back (I didn't, I dodged all but one of those, and it was glancing on the rump) and then went under them.  She said she saw them both stepping all over me.  In reality, the only bruises I have on my body are the shoulder (from Diva) and a bonk on the ribs which is very minor, and a bruise on my left hip where she did step on me.  Diva though danced all over my lower legs.  I have about 20 bruises there, ranging from my left ankle, left knee, right shin, inside my left thigh.... well you get the idea. 

Mom handled it perfectly, and Jae was only steps behind her (he was closing the front gate).  Mom got to me as I was still pretty stupid (spinning, dust, must leave, have to get out from horses!) and she steadied me and asked if I was ok.  I answered honestly, "NO!".  Mom was standing on my right side, and I was leaning against her leg for balance while sitting on the ground.  Lemme tell ya, they rung my bell GOOD.

Jae came around the left, and according to him, he saw blood every where.  My hair, my shirt, my pants, and all over my face.  He asked me something, and when I answered he just stopped me, looked at mom, and said "she's going to need stitches".  He said that he could see my teeth showing through my lower lip/jaw area.  Yeah, you see that pretty laceration they showed up, it went all the way through!  He kept telling me not to talk, but I was SO thirsty, and very light headed.  I told mom I needed water, and off she went like a rocket.

Jae asked me if I could get up, and all I wanted to know was where the girls were.  He said "gone" but I could see Sweetie just outside the paddock fence.  I kept thinking Diva had to be close by, and sure didn't want a repeat.  He told me mom chased them out of the paddock, and Diva was well away, I was fine.  He kept asking if I could get up, and I kept saying "not unless you want me to pass out". 

Finally they got the water, towels, car, and everything you need on one of those emergency runs to the hospital.  At this point I HAD to walk a few feet.  Jae half carried me, and even still after only a few steps I needed to sit back down because I was trying to black out.  I got my wits again, and was back at it.  I managed to make the car, and laid across Jae's lap while Dad drove.  They kept asking me if I was sleepy, but oddly I wasn't.  I just HURT and hurt everywhere.  I didn't want to sit up because of the downside of all that adrenaline making me so light headed.  I guess you would say I was a bit shocky.  I said I would need a wheel chair once we got to the ER.

Arrived at the ER, got my wheel chair, and had to explain to them what happened.  Do you have any idea how hard that is to speak when you have a 4 inch laceration in your lip?  All those Ps, Bs, Ds, and Ts just DO not work with out a solid lip!  And every time I tried, I was a spitting drooly bloody mess.  I'm sure the staff just loved me.

I got in, got settled, got my IV drip (which I wanted badly because I was SO thirsty) and then the pain meds (which I was not looking forward to because they make me ill).  From there it was blood work, X rays, CAT scans and only a small wait before the doc came in to see me.  Oddly enough, everything checked out "better then expected".  No breaks.  I did lose a tooth, and have another that was knocked loose and rather painful, and of course, that ugly looking lip.

Now, keep in mind, that I had not yet seen my face.  I went from a paddock, to laying in a car in the back seat, to a hospital room with no mirrors.  The staff kept making comments about it, and I told them I figured it would scar, but they seemed to think I would be horrified.  They made me wait until it was all sewed up before I could see it.  I guess I was supposed to panic or something, but trust me it did not FEEL as pretty as it turned out.  I was half convinced that I was missing a HUGE chunk of my face.  A little 4 inch cut... that's NOTHING!

So today, I went to see the dentist.  What a wonderful man!  He was so worried about my cut and the stitches that he didn't want to do much, but he did want to see if we can save the tooth I still have.  He numbed me up (and did I mention that lidocain makes me sick to my stomache?) and then shoved it back in and glued it to the tooth next to it.  Oh my.... it feels SO much better!  That tooth had been sagging about 1/4 inch below where it's supposed to be, so every time I moved my mouth at all, it bumped it, sending pain straight through me.  It's almost where it used to be (a bit straighter actually) now, and I can actually eat food.... soft food, but it's a start.

I was told to give it a week if the glue holds, and then come back to see him for the real repairs.  If the glue chips off, come back as soon as possible.  He thinks it will reattach perfectly, but the damage where my other tooth was knocked off will likely require a root canal and a bridge.

Now, let me put this in perspective for y'all.  I have never before been kicked, and now, I have been kicked countless times.  I have never had sutures, and now I have 40.  I have never even had a FILLING, and now I'm gonna get serious dental work.  All of this because I misjudged a distance between horses, and got a little over confident.  I have been working with horses for 13 years, and many of those were NOT nice horses.  I predicted long ago that when I got it, I was gonna get it good.

I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!

But seriously, I've been sharing this story with people to show you that even the most experienced of us do make stupid mistakes.  That's all that this was, and it was MY fault (ok, Diva SHOULD have known better, but she's a 3 year old in heat with a new horse in the pasture.... not the best time to get all over confident).  I figure if my big ugly mug up there helps someone make a better decision, then at least my pain might be worth it a bit.  And for all of you who have made silly mistakes like this yourself, hey... at least we're not alone!

I'll be out for a while.  The pain meds make me stupid and sleepy.  But I'm good, and I'm healing up nicely.  I can't believe there wasn't a single broken bone in the mess.

29 comments:

  1. That was a helluva wreck girl!!! glad you are doing OK. Not gonna tell you shoulda, coulda, woulda's cause you know them, and sometimes even when you do everything right , Accidents happen and I am just glad to read you will recover

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  2. Thanks for sharing your story...and, yes, never lose perspective when you're dealing with horses.Most of the horse people I know, (including myself), have had at least one, if not more, serious incidents with a horse. We must always remember what we are dealing with. Even so, we do treasure these animals, and enjoy them tremendously. Glad you are on the road to recovery!

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  3. I'm sure you know how lucky you are and how much worse it could have been... heck its bad enough as it is!
    I've always heard its your own horses or the old broke horses that will hurt ya, because those are the ones we let our guards down around.

    Root canals aren't that bad if you have a good dentist. Just thought I'd mention it because you hear sooo many horror stories about them.

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  4. Wow!! Glad you're going to be OK - that's very scary. Horse on horse aggression when horses are loose is the scariest thing there is. And mares in heat can certainly be a menace - I got kicked in the face by Dawn when she was in heat when she sniffed noses in the barn - I was picking her feet at the time with her loose on the lead - how stupid was that?

    I think sometimes, as you say, the more experienced we are, the worse mistakes we can make, not so much out of over confidence and certainly not out of ignorance, but just because we spend a lot of time around horses and expect things to go OK because they mostly do.

    Sending good wishes for quick healing.

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  5. I'm really glad you're okay. It will be interesting to see how this works out with Diva.

    I agree with what Kate said about expecting things to go okay because they mostly do. I have had more close calls with Daltrey just being a goofy baby wanting to be too close to me than I ever did with Psycho Gelding.

    Butter is softening for brownies ...

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  6. Wow! What a story and to think that with all of that kicking and stomping going on, there were no broken bones. Not a great day for you, but it could have been so much worse. And, Cowgirl is right, root canals sound awful but they really aren't that bad - expensive.... but...
    You are right about all of us becoming complacent. We have done these things thousands of times before, yada, yada, yada. Your story is a painful reminder that we should always be vigilant and work with our big guys in the safest way possible.

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  7. I've had a hoofprint size bruise on my butt cheek and thigh, but never to the face. I cant imagine the pain. Hope your recovery goes well and maybe find time to relax. Take care.

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  8. Owie. I've never been a fan of working with one loose horse in a field of other loose horses, unless it's something like Mom and Baby and I know Mom pretty well. (Of course, the one time I got kicked was in a stall with a stall-sour horse - go figure.)

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  9. Thanks so much y'all! I tried to be honest about my mistakes and what I was thinking, so people can learn from it.

    And see, I've always been a fan of working with loose horses. To me it's part of the magic of horses. That whole ability to walk out in the green grass, under the blue sky, and know that they will be there for me. I try to train the young ones to know manners, but obviously I didn't do as well as I thought with ONE of them =)

    Will I stop going out in the pasture with them? Nope. Will I be more careful? YES!

    All in all, I am WELL aware how lucky I am, and that this could have been SO much worse. I also know exactly how over confident I got. I KNEW it was coming but thought my britches were big enough to handle it. =) Not a mistake I will make again I tell ya.

    First kick, first stitches, and first serious dental work. Blech.

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  10. Glad you are going to be OK girl!! Thats one helluva wreck for a lot of firsts. Here's hoping for no seconds!!! EVER!!

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  11. Oh my! That looks like it hurts terribly. You're lucky to be alive. I hope it heals quickly and the pain isn't too unbearable.

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  12. Whooooeeeee! That is one serious accident and injury. I hope the tooth can be saved and I hope there's not too much scarring and future issues with your face and mouth. I can imagine you feel like you've been run over by a truck....a few times over and over. But I am amazed that didn't end up with any broken bones. Wow! You are truly lucky!

    "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!"

    You know I had to wryly laugh upon reading those words because that's what so many other people told me and I actually believed after my first horse injury that landed me in the hospital for surgery 3 years ago with a severed ACL.

    I thought, well fine, that was my first ever fall from a horse. "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!" All will be injury free from now on. Hah!

    And just 4 months later, I'm simply walking up to me horse carrying a tube of dewormer preparing to untie her and simply deworm her like I had done in the past....no problems. But she saw the tube and before I could untie her she pulled back so hard that she ripped the welds off the pipe fence and the pipe rammed into the ground, causing the same knee that I had just had surgery on, to sustain a compound fracture. Yeah...just 4 months earlier!

    And I said, "That was my first and only ground injury caused by a horse. "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!"
    I should be safe from anymore injuries, right? Right?

    Another 8 weeks on crutches and more months in rehab, and the selling of that highly reactive mare, and I was back in the saddle again taking lessons on good horses. And then I bought a new horse and she seemed like the sweetest, kindest, gentlest, willing horse ever. I spent hours in the saddle, took her camping, worked on obstacles for competitions at liberty. She was perfect.

    And then one day, I asked her to touch a raven feather, and she wasn't thrilled about it, but she did it. And then I thought I would touch her side with the same raven feather, and she moved so fast, caught me off guard, freaked and gave me a double barrel kick.
    And, of course I happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, because this was a trustworthy horse. I trusted her. But she surprised me and I got her hoof full force on my eye, breaking the orbital bone in several places, causing short term vision problems, and ripping apart my skin.

    Of course, my ripped skin wasn't as bad as yours. I only needed less than 10 stitches, but the scar tissue is noticeable beside my right eye, and "stuff" tends to get stuck in that well created by the scar tissue.

    But afterwards, I said, "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!" That can never happen again, right? I'm free from anymore injuries caused by a horse, for at least a little while, right?

    But a few weeks later I was walking up to the barn with my mare beside me, and she got excited and ran past me, clipping me with her hoof and causing an ugly bruise on my hip.

    BY this time I'm not thinking, "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!" I'm thinking, "I must be jinxed!"

    And a month or so later, I'm trying to move my horse over so I can get by and I point my finger at her side, and she lifts up both her back feet as she moves past me. Gah!
    That time I was lucky and avoided any contact, but it made me realize that serious injuries can happen in an instant, when you least expect it.

    And horses are ALWAYS unpredictable, and we are never 100% in control, even though we may think so. It's that over confidence that gets us in trouble every time.

    When it comes to injuries caused by horses, it truly is a matter of when and not if.

    ~Lisa

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  13. Oh! And I forgot to mention that I noticed how Sweetie and Daltrey look a lot alike. Are they related?

    ~Lisa

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  14. Lisa, yeah Sweetie and Daltrey have the same Sire. Sweetie's Dam is a Sugarbush Draft while Daltrey's is an Appaloosa.

    As for it being "Out of the way" I just meant the "First" part of it. I KNOW I will get hurt working with horses. I accept that. In fact, only a few days before this incident I had a discussion with a client about her horse.

    I told her something to the effect of "any one CAN fix anything about any horse....eventually. What you have to decide is if the process of getting there - all the cuts, bruises, breaks, stitches, concussions, etc - is worth it to YOU".

    I have my slew of injuries with horses. Broke my arm at 13 from falling off a horse I never should have been on (a green broke stallion my horse novice friend owned). From there it's been black eyes and such. I think this actually qualifies as my "worst" accident, but only barely.

    My big thing is that I have a fear of "how bad will it hurt". Never having been kicked, the how bad part is worse then the hurt part in my head. Having a basis of comparison allows me to make those judgement calls (do I get stepped on, or kicked) in bad situations. ok, 90% of it is instinct, but oddly enough I actually DO still think in freak outs like this.

    As an example, my kicks across my body are amazingly only on my peripherals. I am SO freaked out by having a spinal injury that I managed to dodge almost every kick to my back/torso area. Mom thought I got hit 5 times. In reality I could feel the hooves hitting Sweetie right next to me as I dodged like a mofo! That feeling of impact through the horse under my forearms is one of the impressions that has stayed with me.

    Will I get hurt again? Yep. Is it worth it? Yes in order to have horses. And YES I do everything in my power to make sure that injuries do NOT happen to anyone. I am a bit freakish about safety, including mine. That is partially why I shared this, because I had SO much room between the horses that I should have been able to walk away if one came after the other. I had an escape route planned (which failed) and had actually identified the hazard and planned for it and STILL got caught in it.

    I can be a cocky SOB at times, but with horses there's no place for it. We want a thousand or more pound animal that's bred to flee at danger to be predictable? It will never happen. All we can do is train ourselves to jump better, to see the problems before they happen, and to have safety nets in place for WHEN it does.

    At least on that score, my safety net did work... that was about all I got right this time =). I had some one there to save me (2 actually, as I had brought Jae out with me because I didn't know mom was in the barn when I headed out). We had cell phones at the ready in case of the need to call 911 (I didn't need that this time, as I knew my only injuries were non life threatening in that way we all know our bodies). I had a system in place for handling the emergencies: what hospital is closest, who handles the other animals, medical supplies for the trip, etc.

    For me, getting the "first" out of the way is really not that big of a deal. It's only a way to judge hazards more effectively in the future. I am well aware that I will get hurt again, and I am also very willing to take that risk. For me, the few weeks of pain and suffering from a busted lip and bruising is only a pittance compared to the pain I would feel if I didn't have the ability to feel the wind in my face and the roll of muscles working in harmony with me as we canter across the pasture. Nothing we do in life is ever with out the possibility of death. Even walking outside could be lethal. And yet, for ME, the risks of horses ARE worth the rewards. I try hard to minimize those risks, but I would not feel as if my life were filled if I didn't have those rewards.

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  15. Oh My Goodness!! That could have been so much worse! So glad you are OK. And no, it doesn't look as bad as you are describing it! You are still your cute self!

    And for future reference...only groom one horse at a time in a spot where you can have it tied and alone. We value your existence my dear!!

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  16. OMG!!! Glad you weren't killed or brain damaged. Scary! I had my jaw broken by a horse a few years back, so I am familiar with that sort of facial swelling. Heal fast!

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  17. There must be some bad mojo going around because tonight my neighbor friend (Fantastyk Voyager blog) was out riding her gelding back in the fields behind our houses and some dogs ran up to them and freaked our her horse while he tried to get away from them. He flipped over backwards and she fell off. I saw Scout running back to her barn and went looking for her. She can't put any weight on her left ankle and it looks like it may even be broken. She's at the emergency room now. Oy!

    ~Lisa

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  18. Seems that way. I know of someone else that has been injured too.

    Here's hoping she's ok!

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  19. Wow, I'm glad you are on the mend. My worst accident was a similar situation: was putting a halter on the alpha broodmare and one of the other mares came up and just lashed out with her back feet, to teach her a lesson I guess. I saw it coming but couldn't do anything. I got it in the knee and chest. Nothing broke but I still limp and I looked like I had three boobs for a week or so. Pain meds don't work well with me (the red-head genetics) either so I know how that goes. I'm glad you've got family to help out too!
    Cheryl
    www.appaloosas.org
    www.firehorsedesigns.rog

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  20. That is one heck of a beating you took. I surfed in from Laughing Orca to see. Heck of a first kick you took.
    I've been caught between 2 horses like that and was lucky to get away unscathed, but it scared me good and I swore never to do it again if I could help it. Yours is a lesson for all of us.

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  21. OMG! I'm glad you got away with relatively little damage - no breaks, no concussion. I read about a barrel racer who was killed in this kind of situation.

    (Seriously? You've never had a filling? I have one in every tooth!)

    I recently made a stupid move between two horses, so I thanked the saint that protects newbies and swore never to do that again. Now I'm going to be absolutely religious about it after seeing this.

    Heal up and I'm sending you virtual flowers and ice cream.

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  22. Seriously, the ONLY dental work I have ever had was normal cleanings and as a child I had to have some baby teeth pulled because I had too good of roots. That's it.

    And yeah, I'm actually SHOCKED that this is ALL I have to deal with. I did a total bone head thing, and my luck "held" for me. Not even a broken bone, just a laceration and a few teeth cracked. When I got tangled in the horses and went down and had them dancing on my head, I literally thought I was a gonner! Probably why the ER staff couldn't understand my happy attitude. A cut? A permanent scar? WHO CARES! I'm ALIVE!

    Of course, almost a week later, I'm not quite as cheery about it (it itches so bad!) but I'm still very thankful that I got out of that so lightly.

    And I have to stress that I had TONS of room between the horses. As an example, imagine typing a horse in a barn alley and having 3 empty stalls between the back of one hiney and the back of the other. You'd think that's plenty of room. I had more then that (not only that fad back, but that far again sideways). I knew though, that the one mare was pissy, and just never thought she'd clear that gap so fast.

    Anyways, my point is, horses can do amazing things, and moving light lightning is one of them. So even if you think you have enough room, if the horse is grumpy, don't do it! I learned the hard way, and wanna prevent some one else from having 40 stitches =)

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  23. Ooof, what a horrible accident. Glad you turned it into a good post and you got off relatively lightly.

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  24. Ooof, what a horrible accident. Glad you turned it into a good post and you got off relatively lightly.

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  25. Whooooeeeee! That is one serious accident and injury. I hope the tooth can be saved and I hope there's not too much scarring and future issues with your face and mouth. I can imagine you feel like you've been run over by a truck....a few times over and over. But I am amazed that didn't end up with any broken bones. Wow! You are truly lucky!

    "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!"

    You know I had to wryly laugh upon reading those words because that's what so many other people told me and I actually believed after my first horse injury that landed me in the hospital for surgery 3 years ago with a severed ACL.

    I thought, well fine, that was my first ever fall from a horse. "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!" All will be injury free from now on. Hah!

    And just 4 months later, I'm simply walking up to me horse carrying a tube of dewormer preparing to untie her and simply deworm her like I had done in the past....no problems. But she saw the tube and before I could untie her she pulled back so hard that she ripped the welds off the pipe fence and the pipe rammed into the ground, causing the same knee that I had just had surgery on, to sustain a compound fracture. Yeah...just 4 months earlier!

    And I said, "That was my first and only ground injury caused by a horse. "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!"
    I should be safe from anymore injuries, right? Right?

    Another 8 weeks on crutches and more months in rehab, and the selling of that highly reactive mare, and I was back in the saddle again taking lessons on good horses. And then I bought a new horse and she seemed like the sweetest, kindest, gentlest, willing horse ever. I spent hours in the saddle, took her camping, worked on obstacles for competitions at liberty. She was perfect.

    And then one day, I asked her to touch a raven feather, and she wasn't thrilled about it, but she did it. And then I thought I would touch her side with the same raven feather, and she moved so fast, caught me off guard, freaked and gave me a double barrel kick.
    And, of course I happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, because this was a trustworthy horse. I trusted her. But she surprised me and I got her hoof full force on my eye, breaking the orbital bone in several places, causing short term vision problems, and ripping apart my skin.

    Of course, my ripped skin wasn't as bad as yours. I only needed less than 10 stitches, but the scar tissue is noticeable beside my right eye, and "stuff" tends to get stuck in that well created by the scar tissue.

    But afterwards, I said, "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!" That can never happen again, right? I'm free from anymore injuries caused by a horse, for at least a little while, right?

    But a few weeks later I was walking up to the barn with my mare beside me, and she got excited and ran past me, clipping me with her hoof and causing an ugly bruise on my hip.

    BY this time I'm not thinking, "I am kinda glad it's out of the way now!" I'm thinking, "I must be jinxed!"

    And a month or so later, I'm trying to move my horse over so I can get by and I point my finger at her side, and she lifts up both her back feet as she moves past me. Gah!
    That time I was lucky and avoided any contact, but it made me realize that serious injuries can happen in an instant, when you least expect it.

    And horses are ALWAYS unpredictable, and we are never 100% in control, even though we may think so. It's that over confidence that gets us in trouble every time.

    When it comes to injuries caused by horses, it truly is a matter of when and not if.

    ~Lisa

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  26. Oh my! That looks like it hurts terribly. You're lucky to be alive. I hope it heals quickly and the pain isn't too unbearable.

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  27. Owie. I've never been a fan of working with one loose horse in a field of other loose horses, unless it's something like Mom and Baby and I know Mom pretty well. (Of course, the one time I got kicked was in a stall with a stall-sour horse - go figure.)

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  28. Wow!! Glad you're going to be OK - that's very scary. Horse on horse aggression when horses are loose is the scariest thing there is. And mares in heat can certainly be a menace - I got kicked in the face by Dawn when she was in heat when she sniffed noses in the barn - I was picking her feet at the time with her loose on the lead - how stupid was that?

    I think sometimes, as you say, the more experienced we are, the worse mistakes we can make, not so much out of over confidence and certainly not out of ignorance, but just because we spend a lot of time around horses and expect things to go OK because they mostly do.

    Sending good wishes for quick healing.

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  29. That was a helluva wreck girl!!! glad you are doing OK. Not gonna tell you shoulda, coulda, woulda's cause you know them, and sometimes even when you do everything right , Accidents happen and I am just glad to read you will recover

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